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University of Basel

25 March 2015

Prestigious Research Prize for Michael N. Hall

Prof. Dr. Michael N. Hall. (Image: University of Basel, Biozentrum)
Prof. Dr. Michael N. Hall. (Image: University of Basel, Biozentrum)

On 25 March 2015, the five winners of this year’s “Canada Gairdner International Award” were announced. One of the laureates is Prof. Michael N. Hall from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. The award recognizes his discovery of the protein kinase TOR (Target of Rapamycin) and its role as a key regulator of cell growth. With this prize, endowed with CAD 100,000, the Gairdner Foundation each year recognizes research scientists for their groundbreaking discoveries in the medical sciences.

Formal award presentation

With the prize from the Gairdner Foundation, Hall once again receives one of the highest acknowledgments for his excellent and comprehensive research, reaching from the discovery to the elucidation of the importance of TOR for cell growth and metabolism and further to providing answers to medical issues. “There is no greater reward for a scientist than to have his work recognized by his peers – and this is what the Gairdner Award is,” says Hall clearly excited by the distinction. The formal prize presentation will take place on 29 October 2015, at a ceremony in Toronto, Canada.

Award-winning researcher

Michael N. Hall was born in 1953 in Puerto Rico (United States) and has conducted research for over 25 years at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel. His childhood and youth were spent in Venezuela and Peru. After studying molecular biology, he graduated with his doctorate in 1981 from Harvard University in the USA. He subsequently worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Pasteur Institute in Paris, France, and the University of California in San Francisco.

In 1987, the Swiss-American dual citizen accepted an appointment as Assistant Professor at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and is a full Professor of Biochemistry since 1992. During this time, he served for numerous years as the Head of the Division of Biochemistry and as the Vice-Director of the Biozentrum. In the course of his scientific career, Michael Hall has been distinguished with numerous awards including the Clöetta Prize for Biomedical Research (2003), the Louis-Jeantet Prize for Medicine (2009), the Marcel Benoist Prize (2012) as well as the Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences (2014). He is a member of various renowned scientific associations and serves as an editor for scientific journals. In addition, he is currently the Director of the Basel Signaling Alliance, a center of excellence, at the University of Basel.

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