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University of Basel

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Endangered species: Vipera walser (Image: Sylvain Ursenbacher, University of Basel)

Occasion Neuentdeckte europäische Schlange steht vor dem Aussterben

Photographer Sylvain Ursenbacher, University of Basel

Date 08 Jul 2016

Big version 292 KB Print version 2 MB

Prof. Dr. Richard A. Neher (Image: Jörg Abendroth, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology)

Persons Prof. Dr. Richard A. Neher

Photographer Jörg Abendroth, Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology

Date 23 Jun 2016

Big version 603 KB Print version 17 MB

Prof. Dr. Christoph Gerber (Image: Swiss Nanoscience Institute, Florian Moritz)

Persons Prof. Dr. Christoph Gerber

Occasion Christoph Gerber to Receive the Kavli Prize

Photographer Swiss Nanoscience Institute, Florian Moritz

Date 02 Jun 2016

Big version 82 KB Print version 9 MB

The anion-π enzyme consists of an electron-poor arene cofactor (grey stick representation) embedded within a protein (displayed as surface). (Image: University of Basel, Department Chemistry)

Occasion A Negative Enzyme Yields Positive Results

Photographer University of Basel, Department Chemistry

Date 23 May 2016

Big version 82 KB

Prof. Anatole von Lilienfeld

Persons Prof. Anatole von Lilienfeld

Occasion Neue Professoren und Professorinnen an der Universität Basel

Date 20 May 2016

Big version 311 KB Print version 1 MB

Nano beakers of copper atoms (copper colored) are located in a molecular network in which single xenon atoms (blue) are trapped. A low-temperature atomic force microscope with a single xenon atom on the tips is placed above. Scientists were able to quantitatively measure the van der Waals forces interacting between the two xenon atoms for the first time. (Image: University of Basel, Department of Physics)

Occasion Physicists Measure van der Waals Forces of Individual Atoms for the First Time

Photographer University of Basel, Department of Physics

Date 13 May 2016

Big version 294 KB Print version 1 MB

Photon pairs are produced with a source (green point). A photon from each pair is emitted upwards; the other is directed into a semi-transparent mirror (black circle). Following the mirror, the photon exists in two entangled states (symbolized by the yellow figure of eight). The photon is then detected by a detector (top right) or by the eye of the human observer (bottom right). In order for the photons to be detectable by the human eye, they are amplified by laser beams (boxes with yellow triangle symbol). The amplitude and phase of the laser beams can be changed during each run of the experiment, with the result that either the detector or the eye can detect the light pulse, and sometimes both simultaneously or neither at all. Through statistical analysis of the perception of light, quantum physicists can then infer the existence of quantum entanglement. (Illustration: Valentina Caprara Vivoli)

Occasion An Experiment Seeks to Make Quantum Physics Visible to the Naked Eye

Photographer Valentina Caprara Vivoli

Date 02 May 2016

Big version 41 KB Print version 124 KB

Following anti-angiogenic therapy, tumors develop regions containing no blood vessels (green) and therefore no oxygen (red). The tumor cells are made visible by dyeing the nuclei blue. (Image: University of Basel, Department of Biomedicine)

Occasion A New Discovery in the Fight against Cancer: Tumor Cells Switch to a Different Mode

Photographer University of Basel, Department of Biomedicine

Date 28 Apr 2016

Big version 305 KB Print version 286 KB

Using a microchip, a cloud of ultracold atoms is captured and the atoms’ magnetic moments entangled. (Illustration: University of Basel, Department of Physics)

Occasion The atom with no properties

Photographer University of Basel, Department of Physics

Date 21 Apr 2016

Big version 41 KB Print version 107 KB
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