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University of Basel

Future Day

Idea: girls and boys put the shoe on the other foot

Hundreds of companies and institutions open their doors each year to young people in the 5th to 7th grades, giving them the opportunity to discover the working world. Boys and girls are invited to get a glimpse of unfamiliar fields and to question their ideas about what women and men supposedly can and cannot do well. Thus, National Future Day helps to expand and improve the career horizons and future prospects for girls and boys. After all, a career selection unencumbered by stereotypes considerably increases the chances of young people succeeding in their careers.

The next future day will take place at the 9 November 2017. Further information about this special day can be obtained by visiting the official National Future Day website (GER/FR/IT).

Participation at the University of Basel

Future Day at the University of Basel is essentially open to all young people in the fifth to seventh grades. However, the various cantons handle participation in Future Day differently.
For example, Basel-Stadt, Solothurn and Aargau allow young people in the fifth to seventh grade to participate, whereas Basel-Landschaft only allows sixth and seventh graders.
To participate in Future Day, inquire within your school. At many schools, Future Day is already a permanent part of the yearly program. Some require an application for pupils' participation. Further information

The University of Basel allows the children of all members of the university to participate in the basic Future Day program. These girls and boys accompany their fathers, mothers or someone else close to them on the job or during their studies for one day.

The motto of the Future Day is for girls and boys to put the shoe on the other foot. This means that girls and boys in the fifth to seventh grades can spend a day at work with their mother, father or another person close to them such as a neighbor, uncle or friend of the parents. They choose a person who can offer them a glimpse into «gender-atypical» fields of activity. In many cases, this means that boys accompany a female person close to them or girls accompany a male person close to them. Children also gain insight into «gender-atypical» fields of work when boys accompany a man in a social work profession or girls accompany a woman working in a technical profession.
The ideal scenario is for the children and young people to spend a day at work with a person with whom they have regular contact and can talk to about their work and their own ideas about the future.

My profession. Your future?

A female computer scientist, a male childcare provider and a female civil engineer present their professions.


A film by Romana Lanfranconi

On the occasion of the 10-year anniversary of Future Day, a short film was made that presents portraits of three young people who dared to put the shoe on the other foot in their choice of careers: Marilyne Andersen, professor and civil engineer; Ester Tami, computer scientist; and Fabian Müller, childcare provider in training.

Further information
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