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University of Basel

Nanoscience: Portraits

Roderick Lim
Roderick Lim

Roderick Lim | Tissue analysis using nanotechnology

Cancer cells can metastasize and spread quickly, forming secondary tumors in various organs of the body. This is why people suffering from cancer depend on quick diagnostic results. A fast and reliable diagnosis of the tumor’s aggressiveness would thus be a decisive advantage in the fight against cancer.

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Patrick Maletinsky
Patrick Maletinsky

Patrick Maletinsky | The physics of the smallest particles

In a lab full of futuristic looking devices, Professor Patrick Maletinsky is working on how to take theoretical quantum mechanics concepts and transform them into technical applications.

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Daniel Müller
Daniel Müller

Daniel Müller | Tracking molecular interactions

Professor Daniel Müller’s scholarly work focuses on the molecular interactions that control all biological processes. His research group is developing bionanotechnologies to measure inter- and intramolecular interactions. These will make it possible to produce images of cells in nonometer resolution, measure and locate cellular interactions, research how, for example, receptors in living cells communicate and can be controlled through interactions, and much more.

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Martino Poggio
Martino Poggio

Martino Poggio | A high resolution nano world

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has become an integral and indispensable part of medical diagnostics. Inflammations, injuries as well as tumors can be detected using MRI without exposing the patient to high levels of radiation. Using MRI to study tiny nanometer scale objects is, however, a research field that only opened up recently. The Argovia Professor Martino Poggio is one of the pioneers trying new ways to image the nanoscale world with ever better resolution.

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Christian Schönenbergerger
Christian Schönenberger

Christian Schönenberger | Nanomaterials and their Electrical Properties

The research group lead by Professor Christian Schönenberger is experimenting with nanocomponents to explore their electrical properties. The components are based on innovative nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanowires and graphene. These materials offer promising ways to exploit the quantum-mechanical properties for data processing and data communication. These so-called quantum electronics are currently developing into one of the most significant research focuses in the world.

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Richard Warburton
Richard Warburton

Richard J. Warburton | Quantum physics in a semiconductor

Semiconductor technologies such as those used in semiconductor circuits or semiconductor lasers are the building blocks of our computers and the foundation of high-speed data communications on the Internet. To speed them up, ever faster components have to be developed to pack a larger number of transistors onto the surface of a semiconductor chip. Nanoscale components developed in recent years and the resulting nanostructuring of semiconductors are not only a breakthrough for conventional electronics, but for quantum science as well.

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Dominik Zumbühl
Dominik Zumbühl

Dominik Zumbühl | Stable spins for the quantum computer

Dominik Zumbühl describes himself as a person fascinated by physics and driven by the compulsion to discover nature. For six years now, he and his own group in the Department of Physics at the University of Basel have been conducting research and making valuable discoveries in the area of basic research. His research focuses on experiments involving quantum transport in nanostructured materials at low temperatures.

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